Three years after the release of their major label album, O Positive released their second long-player, Home Sweet Head.  After coming out from a bad experience on a major label, the mood of their album was raw, angry, and ultimately triumphant.  In the wake of working with both indie and major labels, however, the band had a tough time adjusting to running their own label.  “We started our own label, Smashing Records, which was a necessary evil,” Herlihy noted.  “I would have liked some help in getting it out there, but the business that surrounded it at that point in time, with the delivery and promotion and the marketing of music, wasn’t something that I was enthused about.  Fulfilling orders and doing distribution contracts and personally doing record-label operations wasn’t what I wanted to do.”
Home Sweet Head would go on to sell 10,000 copies.  It would also be the band’s last studio album.  “The guys wanted a better return on their talents and wanted to do other things.”  In line with O Positive’s social conscience, the final show was a benefit for the Friends of Shannon Lowney, the 25-year-old receptionist at a women’s health clinic who was murdered by anti-abortion zealot John Salvi.  
Though O Positive is no longer an ongoing concern, the quintet has reunited several times in the intervening years for reunion shows.  These have either been benefits – like their 2009 reunion, to benefit Alan Pettiti’s sister Paula – or have been nostalgia shows, like the 2010 show commemorating the 25th anniversary of the fondly remembered local video station V66.  The band may be reuniting in 2013 for another one-off show.  This concert would be in honor of Spit, the legendary new wave club where O Positive played their earliest gigs.  High-res

Three years after the release of their major label album, O Positive released their second long-player, Home Sweet Head.  After coming out from a bad experience on a major label, the mood of their album was raw, angry, and ultimately triumphant.  In the wake of working with both indie and major labels, however, the band had a tough time adjusting to running their own label.  “We started our own label, Smashing Records, which was a necessary evil,” Herlihy noted.  “I would have liked some help in getting it out there, but the business that surrounded it at that point in time, with the delivery and promotion and the marketing of music, wasn’t something that I was enthused about.  Fulfilling orders and doing distribution contracts and personally doing record-label operations wasn’t what I wanted to do.”

Home Sweet Head would go on to sell 10,000 copies.  It would also be the band’s last studio album.  “The guys wanted a better return on their talents and wanted to do other things.”  In line with O Positive’s social conscience, the final show was a benefit for the Friends of Shannon Lowney, the 25-year-old receptionist at a women’s health clinic who was murdered by anti-abortion zealot John Salvi. 

Though O Positive is no longer an ongoing concern, the quintet has reunited several times in the intervening years for reunion shows.  These have either been benefits – like their 2009 reunion, to benefit Alan Pettiti’s sister Paula – or have been nostalgia shows, like the 2010 show commemorating the 25th anniversary of the fondly remembered local video station V66.  The band may be reuniting in 2013 for another one-off show.  This concert would be in honor of Spit, the legendary new wave club where O Positive played their earliest gigs.